Study

Differential use of ponds and movements by two species of aquatic turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata and Chelydra serpentina serpentina) and their role in colonization

  • Published source details Hughes D.F., Tegeler A.K. & Meshaka Jr W.E. (2016) Differential use of ponds and movements by two species of aquatic turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata and Chelydra serpentina serpentina) and their role in colonization. Herpetological Conservation and Biology, 11, 214-231.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Create or restore ponds

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Create or restore ponds

    A replicated study in 1957–1980 and 2005–2013 in mixed oak forest and agricultural land in Pennsylvania, USA (Hughes et al. 2016) found that 30–60 years after eight artificial ponds were created, two aquatic turtle species were present in all almost all ponds. Approximately 30–60 years after eight artificial ponds were created, common snapping turtles Chelydra serpentina serpentina were present at all eight ponds and midland painted turtles Chrysemys picta marginata were present at six of eight ponds. In one pond, both adult and juvenile individuals were caught of both species. The authors reported that common snapping turtles first colonised one pond three years after it was created and midland painted turtles were first recorded in the same pond 16 years after it was created. In 1957–1980, eight artificial ponds (872–5,989 m2) were constructed on either side of the boundary of a nature reserve (856 ha). Turtles were monitored using two baited hoop-nets/pond for two consecutive sets of five-day trapping periods in June–July 2005–2013. One pond was monitored for turtles in 2005–2013 and the remaining seven ponds were monitored for turtles in 2013 only. All turtles were individually marked prior to release.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

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