Study

Nassarius reticulatus (Nassariidae: Gastropoda) as an indicator of tributyltin pollution before and after TBT restrictions

  • Published source details Bryan G.W., Burt G.R., Gibbs P.E. & Pascoe P.L. (1993) Nassarius reticulatus (Nassariidae: Gastropoda) as an indicator of tributyltin pollution before and after TBT restrictions. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 73, 913-929.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Restrict the use of tributyltin or other toxic antifouling coatings

Action Link
Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation
  1. Restrict the use of tributyltin or other toxic antifouling coatings

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 1985–1993 of seven soft seabed sites in the southwest English Channel, UK (Bryan et al. 1993) found that restricting the use of tributyltin (TBT) resulted in decreases in tributyltin concentrations in netted dogwhelks Nassarius reticulatus and in the penis length of female dogwhelks, at five of the sites five years after the restriction. In these five sites, TBT concentrations in dogwhelks were lower five years after the restriction (8–68 ng/g; range of averages across sites) compared to before (123–390 ng/g). The penis length of females was lower five years after the restriction (3–5 mm) compared to before (5–7 mm). There were no changes in the penis length of males over time (data not presented). There were no statistical trends over time at the other two sites. The use of antifouling ship paints containing TBT was restricted in 1987 in the UK. Approximately every six months between 1985 and 1993, at least 30–40 dogwhelks were collected using a dredge or by diving at each of seven sites at 9 m depth. The TBT concentration of each individual (after being dried) and their penis length were measured as affected female marine invertebrates develop male genitals.

    (Summarised by: Anaëlle Lemasson)

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