Study

Multifunctional benefits of an agri-environment scheme option: riparian buffer strip pools within 'arable reversion'

  • Published source details Stoate C., Whitfield M., Williams P., Szczur J. & Driver K. (2007) Multifunctional benefits of an agri-environment scheme option: riparian buffer strip pools within 'arable reversion'. Aspects of Applied Biology, 81, 221-226.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Create scrapes and pools

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Provide buffer strips alongside water courses (rivers and streams)

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Create scrapes and pools

    A single-site study from 2004 to 2006 in Leicestershire, UK (Stoate et al. 2007) found that a sequence of seven constructed pools within a riparian buffer strip provided habitat for a range of plant and invertebrate species. Pools each supported 9-18 species of aquatic plant (macrophytes) (30 overall) and 24-52 species of aquatic invertebrates (84 overall), these included the locally scarce marsh dock Rumex palustris and six Nationally Scarce and four locally uncommon water beetles (Coleoptera). The field drain fed wetland was constructed in 1998. The pool sequence was a maximum of 20 m wide, within a riparian buffer strip approximately 70 m wide by 100 m long. Aquatic plants were listed and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled (3 minutes/pool, June 2004-2005) in six of seven pools.

  2. Provide buffer strips alongside water courses (rivers and streams)

    A single-site study from 2004 to 2006 in Leicestershire, UK (Stoate et al. 2007) found that a sequence of seven constructed pools and a riparian buffer strip provided habitat for plant, invertebrate and bird diversity including previously absent species. Pools supported 30 aquatic plant species (macrophytes) including two locally scarce species (9-18 species/pool). Six Nationally Scarce and four locally uncommon water beetles (Coleoptera) were found in the pools (total 84 invertebrate species, 24-52 species/pool). Five species of grasshopper and cricket (Orthoptera) previously absent from the site were recorded, in addition to twelve hoverfly (Syrphidae) species of which two were scarce or new county records. More whitethroat Sylvia communis, reed bunting Emberiza schoeniclus and moorhen Gallinula chloropus territories were found following establishment of the wetland (4, 3 and 1 territories with pools/buffer strip vs 1, 1 and 0 prior to pools/buffer strip). The buffer strip was also used by lapwing Vanellus vanellus, yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella (breeding species), common snipe Gallinago gallinago and jack snipe Lymnocryptes minimus (overwintering species). The field drain fed wetland was constructed in 1998. The pool sequence was a maximum of 20 m wide, within a riparian buffer strip approximately 70 m wide by 100 m long. Aquatic plants were listed and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled (3 minutes/pool, June 2004-2005) in six of seven pools. Grasshoppers and crickets (June 2005-2006) were sampled and a ten-visit territory mapping bird survey (May-June 2006) undertaken within the buffer strip; birds had also been surveyed in 1992.

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