Study

The importance of viticultural landscape features and ecosystem service enhancement for native butterflies in New Zealand vineyards

  • Published source details Gillespie M. & Wratten S.D. (2012) The importance of viticultural landscape features and ecosystem service enhancement for native butterflies in New Zealand vineyards. Journal of Insect Conservation, 16, 13-23.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Replant native vegetation

Action Link
Butterfly and Moth Conservation

Increase the proportion of natural or semi‐natural habitat in the farmed landscape

Action Link
Butterfly and Moth Conservation
  1. Replant native vegetation

    A replicated, site comparison study in 2008–2009 in six vineyards in Canterbury Province, New Zealand (Gillespie & Wratten 2012) found that planted native vegetation had a similar abundance and species richness of butterflies to amongst the vines or on pasture, but all were lower than in remnant native habitat patches. In planted native vegetation, the abundance (3 individuals/section) and species richness (0.5 species) of butterflies was similar to amongst the grape vines (abundance: 8 individuals/section; richness: 0.3 species) and on pasture fields (abundance: 7 individuals/section; richness: 0.5 species), but lower than in remnant native habitat patches (abundance: 14 individuals/section; richness: 0.7 species). See paper for individual species results. Six vineyards, each containing small (100–200 m2) areas of planted native shrubs and grasses and areas of remnant native vegetation (typically stands of matagouri Discaria toumatou and New Zealand bindweed Calystegia tuguriorum), alongside grape vines and grazed pasture, were selected. From October 2008–April 2009, butterflies were surveyed 13 times (once/fortnight) along a fixed transect through the different habitat patches on each vineyard. Transects were split into 9–14 sections based on habitat type for analysis.

    (Summarised by: Andrew Bladon)

  2. Increase the proportion of natural or semi‐natural habitat in the farmed landscape

    A replicated, site comparison study in 2008–2009 in six vineyards in Canterbury Province, New Zealand (Gillespie & Wratten 2012) found that remnant native habitat patches had a higher abundance and species richness of butterflies than amongst the vines, on pasture or in planted native vegetation. In remnant habitat patches, the abundance (14 individuals/section) and species richness (0.7 species) of butterflies was higher than amongst the grape vines (abundance: 8 individuals/section; richness: 0.3 species), on pasture fields (abundance: 7 individuals/section; richness: 0.5 species), or in planted native vegetation (abundance: 3 individuals/section; richness: 0.5 species). See paper for individual species results. Six vineyards, each containing areas of remnant native vegetation (typically stands of matagouri Discaria toumatou and New Zealand bindweed Calystegia tuguriorum) and small (100–200 m2) areas of planted native shrubs and grasses, alongside grape vines and grazed pasture, were selected. From October 2008–April 2009, butterflies were surveyed 13 times (once/fortnight) along a fixed transect through the different habitat patches on each vineyard. Transects were split into 9–14 sections based on habitat type for analysis.

    (Summarised by: Andrew Bladon)

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 19

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust