Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use a smaller beam trawl One study examined the effects of using a smaller beam trawl on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the North Sea (Germany and Netherlands).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the North Sea found that a smaller beam trawl caused similar mortality of invertebrates in the trawl tracks compared to a larger beam trawl. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2127https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2127Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:23:07 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Fit a funnel (such as a sievenet) or other escape devices on shrimp/prawn trawl nets One study examined the effects of fitting a funnel, sievenet, or other escape devices on trawl nets on marine subtidal invertebrate. The study was in the North Sea (UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the North Sea found that trawl nets fitted with a sievenet appeared to catch fewer unwanted catch of non-commercial invertebrates compared to unmodified nets. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2131https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2131Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:27:16 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Fit one or more mesh escape panels/windows and one or more soft, rigid or semi-rigid grids or frames to trawl nets One study examined the effects on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations of fitting one or more mesh escape panels/windows and one or more soft, rigid or semi-rigid grids or frames to trawl nets . The study was in the Gulf of Carpentaria (Australia).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in Gulf of Carpentaria found that trawl nets fitted with an escape window and a grid reduced the total weight of small unwanted catch and caught fewer unwanted large sponges, compared to unmodified nets. OTHER (1 STUDY) Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in Carpentaria found that trawl nets fitted with an escape window and a grid reduced the catch of commercially targeted prawns, compared to unmodified nets. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2134https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2134Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:52:46 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use a larger codend mesh size on trawl nets One study examined the effects of using a larger codend mesh size on trawl nets on unwanted catch of subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the Gulf of Mexico (Mexico).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch species richness/diversity (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the Gulf of Mexico found that trawl nets fitted with a larger mesh codend caught fewer combined species of non-commercial unwanted invertebrates and fish compared to a traditional codend. POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the Gulf of Mexico found that trawl nets fitted with a larger mesh codend caught lower combined biomass and abundance of non-commercial unwanted invertebrates and fish compared to a traditional codend. OTHER (1 STUDY) Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the Gulf of Mexico found that trawl nets fitted with a larger mesh codend caught less biomass and abundance of commercially targeted shrimps compared to a traditional codend, but that the biomass ratios of commercially targeted to discard species was similar for both. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2135https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2135Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:53:57 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use a square mesh instead of a diamond mesh codend on trawl nets One study examined the effects of using a square mesh instead of a diamond mesh codend on trawl nets on unwanted catch of subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the English Channel (UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the English Channel found that a trawl net with a square mesh codend caught less non-commercial unwanted invertebrates in one of two areas, and similar amounts in the other area, compared to a standard diamond mesh codend. OTHER (1 STUDY) Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the English Channel found that a trawl net with a square mesh codend caught similar amounts of commercially targeted fish species in two areas, and that in one of two areas it caught more commercially important shellfish, compared to a standard diamond mesh codend. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2136https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2136Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:56:11 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Fit one or more soft, semi-rigid, or rigid grids or frames to trawl nets and use square mesh instead of a diamond mesh at the codend One study examined the effects of fitting one or more soft, semi-rigid, or rigid grids or frames to trawl nets and using a square mesh codend on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the Gulf of St Vincent (Australia).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in Gulf of St Vincent found that trawl nets fitted with a rigid U-shaped grid and a square-oriented mesh codend reduced the catch rates of three dominant groups of unwanted invertebrate catch species, compared to unmodified nets. OTHER (1 STUDY) Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the Gulf of St Vincent found that trawl nets fitted with a rigid U-shaped grid and a square-oriented mesh codend reduced the catch rates of the commercially targeted western king prawn, due to reduced catch of less valuable smaller-sized prawns, compared to unmodified nets. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2137https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2137Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:57:05 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Fit one or more mesh escape panels/windows to trawl nets and use a square mesh instead of a diamond mesh codend One study examined the effects of fitting one or more mesh escape panels to trawl nets and using a square mesh instead of a diamond mesh codend on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the English Channel (UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the English Channel found that trawl nets fitted with two large square mesh release panels and a square mesh codend caught fewer unwanted catch of non-commercial invertebrates compared to standard trawl nets. OTHER (1 STUDY) Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the English Channel found that trawl nets fitted with two large square mesh release panels and a square mesh codend caught fewer commercial shellfish, and fewer but more valuable commercially important fish, compared to standard trawl nets. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2138https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2138Tue, 22 Oct 2019 10:59:13 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Modify the design/attachments of a shrimp/prawn W-trawl net One study examined the effects of modifying the design/attachments of a W-trawl net used in shrimp/prawn fisheries on unwanted catch of subtidal benthic invertebrate. The study was in Moreton Bay (Australia).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch overall abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in Moreton Bay found that four designs of W-trawl nets used in shrimp/prawn fisheries caught less non-commercial unwanted catch of crustaceans compared to a traditional Florida Flyer trawl net. OTHERS (1 STUDY) Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in Moreton Bay found that four designs of W-trawl nets used in shrimp/prawn fisheries caught lower amounts of the commercially targeted prawn species compared to a traditional Florida Flyer trawl net. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2139https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2139Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:00:22 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use a larger mesh size on trammel nets One study examined the effects of using a larger mesh size on trammel nets on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the North Atlantic Ocean (Portugal).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch community composition (1 study): One replicated, controlled, study in the North Atlantic Ocean found that using larger mesh sizes in the inner and/or outer panels of trammel nets did not affect the community composition of unwanted catch of non-commercial invertebrates (discard). POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled, study in the North Atlantic Ocean found that using larger mesh sizes in the inner and/or outer panels of trammel nets did not reduce the abundance of unwanted catch of non-commercial invertebrates (discard). Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2141https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2141Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:07:22 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use traps instead of fishing nets One study examined the effects of using traps instead of fishing nets on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study took place in the Mediterranean Sea (Spain).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in the Mediterranean Sea found that the combined amount of unwanted catch of invertebrates and fish appeared lower using plastic traps than trammel nets, but higher using collapsible traps. OTHER (1 STUDY) Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in the Mediterranean Sea found that the catch of commercially targeted lobsters was lower using traps than in trammel nets. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2142https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2142Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:08:46 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use different bait species in traps One study examined the effects of using different bait species in traps on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study took place in the South Pacific Ocean (New Zealand).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in the South Pacific Ocean found that the type of bait used in fishing pots did not change the amount of unwanted invertebrates caught. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2145https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2145Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:16:22 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Fit one or more soft, semi-rigid, or rigid grids or frames on pots and traps One study examined the effects of fitting one or more soft, semi-rigid, or rigid grids or frames on pots and traps on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study took place in the Corindi River system (Australia).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in the Corindi River system found that traps fitted with escape frames appeared to reduce the proportion of unwanted undersized mud crabs caught, compared to conventional traps without escape frames. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2146https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2146Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:17:56 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Increase the mesh size of pots and traps One study examined the effects of increasing the mesh size of pots and traps on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study took place in the Corindi River system (Australia).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in the Corindi River system found that traps designed with larger mesh appeared to reduce the proportion of unwanted undersized mud crabs caught, compared to conventional traps of smaller mesh. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2148https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2148Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:20:04 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Fit one or more soft, semi-rigid, or rigid grids or frames and increase the mesh size of pots and traps One study examined the effects of fitting one or more soft, semi-rigid, or rigid grids or frames and increasing the mesh size of pots and traps on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study took place in the Corindi River system (Australia).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in the Corindi River system found that traps fitted with escape frames and designed with larger mesh appeared to reduce the proportion of unwanted undersized mud crabs caught, compared to conventional traps without escape frames and smaller mesh. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2149https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2149Tue, 22 Oct 2019 11:21:17 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Remove or capture non-native, invasive or other problematic species One study examined the effects of removing or capturing non-native, invasive or other problematic species on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the South Atlantic Ocean (Brazil).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Cnidarian abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the southwest Atlantic found that, regardless of the method used, removing invasive corals reduced the cover of native zoanthids. Sponge abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the southwest Atlantic found that the effect of removing invasive corals on the cover of native sponges varied with the removal method used. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2173https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2173Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:23:21 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Set or improve minimum sewage treatment standards One study examined the effects of improving minimum sewage treatment standards on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the Bay of Biscay (Spain).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall community composition (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Bay of Biscay found that after introducing a secondary treatment of sewage wastewaters, invertebrate community composition at an impacted site did not significantly change compared to unimpacted sites. Overall richness/diversity (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Bay of Biscay found that after introducing a secondary treatment of sewage wastewaters, invertebrate richness and diversity at an impacted site did not significantly change compared to unimpacted sites. POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall abundance (1 study): One before-and-after, site comparison study in the Bay of Biscay found that after introducing a secondary treatment of sewage wastewaters, total cover of invertebrates significantly increased at an impacted site at 8 m but not 3 m depth, compared to unimpacted sites. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2180https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2180Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:36:42 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Remove or clean-up oil pollution following a spill One study examined the effects of removing and cleaning-up oil pollution following a spill on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the Baltic Proper (Sweden).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Mollusc condition (1 study): One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the Baltic Proper found that after cleaning-up spilled oil using high pressure hot water, crude oil content increased in mussels and did not naturally decrease over time, and was higher than in mussels from an uncleaned contaminated and a non-contaminated site. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2183https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2183Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:43:22 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Remove and clean-up shoreline waste disposal sites One study examined the effects of removing and cleaning-up shoreline waste disposal sites on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the Southern Ocean (Antarctica).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall community composition (1 study): One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the Southern Ocean found that after removing and cleaning-up a disused waste disposal site, invertebrate community composition changed, and no further negative impacts were detected, but communities remained different to natural sites. Overall richness/diversity (1 study): One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the Southern Ocean found that after removing and cleaning-up a disused waste disposal site, invertebrate species richness did not change over time and remained different to that of natural sites, but no further negative impacts were detected. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2215https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2215Tue, 22 Oct 2019 13:32:05 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Designate a Marine Protected Area and install physical barriers to prevent trawling One study examined the effects of installing physical barriers to prevent trawling in a protected area on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the South China Sea (Hong Kong).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Worm community composition (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the South China Sea found that sites in a protected area where physical barriers were installed to prevent trawling had a different community composition of nematode worms compared to nearby unprotected fished sites, after up to two years. Worm species richness/diversity (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the South China Sea found that sites in a protected area where physical barriers were installed to prevent trawling had similar diversity and species richness of nematode worms to nearby unprotected fished sites, after up to two years. POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the South China Sea found that sites in a protected area where physical barriers were installed to prevent trawling had fewer small invertebrates compared to nearby unprotected fished sites, after up to two years. Worm abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the South China Sea found that sites in a protected area where physical barriers were installed to prevent trawling had fewer nematode worms compared to nearby unprotected fished sites, after up to two years. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2227https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2227Tue, 22 Oct 2019 15:05:31 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Designate a Marine Protected Area and prohibit dredging One study examined the effects of prohibiting dredging in marine protected areas on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the Firth of Lorn (UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall community composition (1 study): One paired, replicated, site comparison study in the Firth of Lorn found that sites inside a protected area that had been prohibiting dredging for approximately 2.5 years had different combined invertebrate and fish community composition compared to unprotected dredged sites. POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall abundance (1 study): One paired, replicated, site comparison study in the Firth of Lorn found that sites inside a protected area that had been prohibiting dredging for approximately 2.5 years typically had greater combined cover of bryozoans and hydroids (combined) compared to unprotected dredged sites. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2228https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2228Tue, 22 Oct 2019 15:06:59 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Designate a Marine Protected Area and only allow hook and line fishing One study examined the effects of allowing only hook and line fishing in marine protected areas on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the Skagerrak (Norway).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Crustacean abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the Skagerrak found that sites inside a protected area only allowing hook and line fishing had greater increases in lobster abundance over the four years after the area was designated compared to unprotected fully fished sites. Crustacean condition (1 study): One replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in the Skagerrak found that sites inside a protected area only allowing hook and line fishing had greater increases in lobster size over the four years after the area was designated compared to unprotected fully fished sites. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2233https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2233Tue, 22 Oct 2019 15:41:16 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Designate a Marine Protected Area and prohibit the harvesting of conch One study examined the effects of prohibiting the harvesting of conch in marine protected areas on their populations and/or other subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study was in the North Atlantic Ocean (British Overseas Territories).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Mollusc abundance (1 study): One site comparison study in the North Atlantic Ocean found that a marine protected area prohibiting the commercial harvest of conch had more conch after five years compared to a fished area. Mollusc condition (1 study): One site comparison study in the North Atlantic Ocean found that a marine protected area prohibiting the commercial harvest of conch had smaller adult conch after five years compared to a fished area. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2237https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2237Tue, 22 Oct 2019 15:44:24 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Designate a Marine Protected Area and prohibit aquaculture activity One study examined the effects of prohibiting aquaculture activity in a protected area on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in Tapong Bay lagoon (Taiwan).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Crustacean abundance (1 study): One before-and-after study in Tapong Bay lagoon found that two and a half years after removing oyster aquaculture in a marine protected area, the biomasses of amphipods and shrimps had decreased, and that the biomass of crabs had not changed. Mollusc abundance (1 study): One before-and-after study in Tapong Bay lagoon found that two and a half years after removing oyster aquaculture in a marine protected area, the biomasses of gastropods and bivalves had decreased. Worm abundance (1 study): One before-and-after study in Tapong Bay lagoon found that two and a half years after removing oyster aquaculture in a marine protected area, the biomass of polychaete worms had stayed the same. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2240https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2240Wed, 23 Oct 2019 08:37:47 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Establish community-based fisheries management One study examined the effects of establishing community-based fisheries management on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the Foveaux Straight (New Zealand).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Mollusc abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the Foveaux Straight found that a customary fisheries area where management was community-based had more New Zealand scallops compared to a protected area prohibiting all fishing and an area allowing recreational harvest. Mollusc condition (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the Foveaux Straight found that a customary fisheries area where management was community-based, tended to have smaller New Zealand scallops compared to a protected area prohibiting all fishing and an area allowing recreational harvest. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2242https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2242Wed, 23 Oct 2019 08:39:43 +0100Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Restore biogenic habitats (other methods) - Restore mussel beds Two studies examined the effects of restoring mussel beds (not by transplanting or translocating mussels) on mussels and mussel bed-associated subtidal benthic invertebrates. Both were in Strangford Lough (UK).   COMMUNITY RESPONSE (2 STUDIES) Overall community composition (2 studies): One replicated, controlled study in Strangford Lough found that after restoring beds of horse mussels by adding scallop shells to the seabed, overall invertebrate community composition in restored plots was different to that of unrestored plots. One replicated, controlled study in the same area found that after restoring beds of horse mussels by adding scallop shells to the seabed and translocating horse mussels, overall invertebrate community composition in plots restored with shells and mussels was different to plots restored without mussels (shells only), and both were different to unrestored plots and to nearby natural horse mussel beds. Overall species richness/diversity (2 studies): One replicated, controlled study in Strangford Lough found that after restoring beds of horse mussels by adding scallop shells to the seabed, overall invertebrate species diversity was lower in restored plots compared to unrestored plots, but species richness was similar. One replicated, controlled study in the same area found that after restoring beds of horse mussels by adding scallop shells to the seabed and translocating horse mussels, species richness and diversity were higher in restored plots with mussels and shells compared to plots with shells only, and similar to nearby natural horse mussel beds. POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Overall abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in Strangford Lough found that after restoring beds of horse mussels by adding scallop shells to the seabed, overall invertebrate abundance was higher in restored plots compared to unrestored plots. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2247https%3A%2F%2Fconservationevidencejournal.com%2Factions%2F2247Wed, 23 Oct 2019 09:33:18 +0100
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What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

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The Conservation Evidence Journal

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